Courses

Composition 

ENG 100 English Structure and Grammar
ENG 100 is to be taken concurrently with ENG 101 and is intended to provide additional practice in English grammar and structure. The course will focus on the fundamentals of correct and effective writing in English: vocabulary (including denotation, connotation, and register), grammar, and syntactic logic (arrangement of clauses and phrases, subordination, coordination, etc), giving some attention to spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and other surface features of written English. Students will gain extensive practice in writing through pre-writing activities, sentence revision and paragraph writing exercises, group writing, note-taking, grammar and vocabulary drills, and group discussion. The requirement in ENG 100 may be satisfied upon admission by designated scores on the SAT exam. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Open only to first year students enrolled simultaneously in ENG 101.

ENG 101 Exposition 
This course stresses clear and precise communication. Students will critically analyze texts and use them as models for their own writing. Special attention will be placed upon the composing process from invention to revision. Students will revise drafts for correct mechanics and grammar, clarity of sentences, coherence in paragraphs, and effective organization of essays. Each student will prepare and deliver an informative speech in connection with one of the essay assignments. Cr.4. (8 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester.

ENG 102  Writing Academic Research Papers 
This course prepares students to conduct academic research and write academic research papers. Stress will be placed on research as a process that is constantly under revision. The course focuses on two forms of research paper, the argumentative and the analytical, or exploratory, research paper. Students will be expected to critically assess sophisticated source material and integrate outside academic sources into their research papers. Special attention will be placed upon the establishment of credibility through the use of reliable sources and the logical development of ideas and arguments. Each student will prepare and deliver a short presentation based on their final research project. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Cr. 4. (8 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester. 

Literature

ENG 210 Introduction to Literature   
An introduction to the formal elements of literature. Texts are selected according to author, theme, genre, or topic. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester.

ENG 231 World Literature: Landmark Texts 
This course introduces students to texts that have profoundly influenced and continue to shape philosophical discourse, religious thought, the visual arts, imaginative literature, and other aspects of culture in places and times far removed from those in which they were originally composed. Assigned texts are English translations of texts selected from a broad range of influential writings that may include the Hebrew scriptures; ancient Greek and /or Roman poetry, drama, and philosophy; foundational Christian and / or Islamic texts; medieval, Renaissance, and/or modern European literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered every 2 years.

ENG 232 World Literature: Literatures in Translation
This course introduces students to important literary texts from a wide range of cultural traditions and historical periods in order to promote great awareness of the diverse ways in which the world has been understood and imagined. Assigned readings are English translations of texts that represent or have significantly influenced the beliefs, values or artistic traditions of societies beyond the European/Anglo-American "West" and texts that are culturally important in particular local traditions within this "West" but not well-known beyond them. Readings may include selections from the oral traditions of indigenous societies in the Americas, Australasia, Africa, and elsewhere as well as from the literary canons of East Asian, Indian, Arabic, or other societies with long traditions of writing. Readings may also include newer works significantly reflecting any of these traditions. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered every 2 years.

ENG 241 American Literature: Beginnings to 1865
This course will cover American literature from its beginnings to 1865. We will read short stories, novels, poems, and essays by writers working across a century-and- a-half of American history and dealing with the changes through which American culture has gone from the colonial era through the end of the Civil War. We will pay equal attention as we read to the way American writers have written the ways they have invented new forms through which to describe new worlds and to the ways in which they have influenced each other. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered in the Fall.

ENG 242 American Literature: 1865 - Present
This course will cover American literature from 1865 to the present. We will read short stories, novels, poems, and essays by writers working across a century-and-a-half of American history and dealing with the changes through which American culture has gone. These include changes in industry, technology, demographics, in what America means and what it means to be an American, in America's position in the world. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered in the Spring.

ENG 251 British Literature: Beginnings to 1785
This course introduces students to British literature from its beginnings to 1785 by surveying a wide range of periods, genres, literature movements and traditions, and representative and well-known authors. Texts and authors may include Boewulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the plays of William Shakespeare, and the works of John Milton, as well as lesser-known authors. Literary periods may include the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and Eighteenth century. Prerequisites: ENG 101. Gen Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered once every two years.

ENG 252 British Literature: 1785 to Present
This course introduces student to British literature from 1785 to the present by surveying a wide range of periods, genres, literature movements and traditions, and representative and well-known authors. Authors may include William Blake, William Wordsworth, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, and Chinua Achebe, as well as lesser-known authors. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered once every two years.

ENG 260 Balkan Literature  
The history and traditions of Southeastern European literature. Texts are selected according to author, genre, period, theme, or topic. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Gen. Ed: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered irregularly.

ENG 300 The Bible as Literature    
A general-purpose scholastic introduction to one of the most important texts of the past. The Bible has exercised an enormous influence on European culture, ways of life, moral codes, languages, and art. The English Bible has molded the contemporary English language in all its variants. Formerly listed as ENG 200. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102, one other Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed: Literary Case Studies. Cr. 4.  (8 ECTS Cr.) Offered in the Fall. 

ENG 311 Public Speaking   
Theory and practice of spoken communication: interviews, oral readings, informative speeches, demonstration speeches, role-playing, impromptu and extemporaneous speeches. Prerequisite: ENG 102. Cr. 3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered in the Fall. 

ENG 340 Topics in American Literature
This course is one of advanced study of American literary works. Topics will vary but may be centered on American literary periods and/or movements, such as Colonial American literature, American Romanticism, Naturalism and Realism, Modernism, and Contemporary American literature. The course may be repeated for credit on different topics. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102 and one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen Ed.: Literary Case Studies. Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.). Offered in the Spring.

Recent courses taught in ENG 340 include

ENG 340a: Topics in American Literature: American Writers in Europe between the Two World Wars

During the 20th century, American literature was one of the most interesting Western literatures. However, the very idea of the exceptional importance of Western literatures was questioned in the second half of the century, in the post-modern time of globalism and multiculturalism. American society is in itself more multicultural than all European societies. One very intriguing phenomenon though is the fact that many of the best American writers and poets used to live and work in Europe between the two World Wars. Some of them are T.S. Eliot (who in 1927 would become a British citizen), Ezra Pound (who was not only an important Modern poet, but a great promoter of Eliot, Joyce, Hemingway and others), Hilda Doolittle, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein (who coined the term “Lost Generation” used for the expatriate writers in Europe at that time), Hart Crane, E.E. Cummings, Robert Frost, W.C. Williams, F.S. Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Henry Miller. This class will focus mostly on poetry and prose by T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, and Francis Scott Fitzgerald: four great American Modernists, who lived and created some work of lasting importance in London and Paris between the beginning of World War I (1914) and the beginning of the great depression (1929). Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

ENG 340b: Postmodern Fictions

This course provides an advanced study of contemporary American fiction with particular reference to the concept of postmodernism. A broad range of authors from the 1960s to early 2000s will be studied including Kathy Acker, Sherman Alexie, Paul Auster, John Barth, Donald Barthelme, Angel Carter, E.L Doctorow, Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Graham Swift and Gerald Vizner. The postmodern critique of meta-narratives and the literary canon will be addressed through discussion of contemporary feminist, black, native American, post-colonial and post-human narratives. Key theorists of postmodernity, such as Jean Baudrillard, Umberto Eco, Donna Haraway, bell hooks, Linda Hutcheon, Fredric Jameson, and Jean François Lyotard will be read in conjunction with specific literary works. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and one Principles of Literary Analysis. Gen. Ed.: Literary case Studies. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS).

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ENG 350 Topics in British Literature
The course is one of advanced study of British literary works. Topics will vary but may be centered on British literary periods and/or movements, such as Medieval, Renaissance, Seventeenth-century, Eighteenth-century, Romantic, Victorian, Modern and Contemporary British literature. The course may be repeated for credit on different topics. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102 and one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed.: Literary Case Studies. Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.). Offered in the Spring.

Recent courses taught in ENG 350 include

ENG 350a: Gothic and Romantic: Uses of the Supernatural

This is a textual analysis course with a thematic focus on the manifestations of the supernatural in the Gothic novel and Romantic poetry in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. The period in Britain’s literary history that will concern us spans, roughly, seventy years (1760-1830). This period saw the rise of two conflicting yet complementary literary traditions: The Gothic and the Romantic. The Romantics tended to look down on the supposedly low aesthetic standards of Gothic fiction, but they used many Gothic techniques in some of their most notable works. It is this love-hate relationship between the Gothic and the Romantic that the course seeks to explore. Close attention will be devoted to the horror-inducing presence of the specter/ghost in some key Gothic novels and Romantic poems. These include, among others, Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho, Matthew Lewis’ The Monk, William Blake’s Jerusalem, S.T. Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and one Principles of Literary Analysis. Gen. Ed.: Literary case Studies. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS).

ENG 350b: Pre-Raphaelite to Decadent: the English End-of-the-Century

By the middle of the 19th century, the Pre-Raphaelites painters and poets had gained considerable notoriety for “the strangeness” of their work. Both in poetry and in painting they attempted to return to a happier time before the lessons of the Great Masters had become diluted and corrupted. In painting that time was “before Raphael,” and in poetry it was the era of Dante and the troubadours. Art was conceived by the Pre-Raphaelites as a correcting force in a dissatisfying, decaying present. By the end of the century, however, Oscar Wilde would announce that the sole purpose of art was art itself. Art had no business teaching lessons and correcting social injustices. How do we arrive at such a radical transformation of the idea of art’s social role? In this course, we will trace the development of the ideas about literature, and by extension, about art’s role in the everyday organization of life in the second half of the British 19th century. We will start with some Pre-Raphaelite poetry and prose, and gradually make our way through texts by John Ruskin, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley and James Whistler. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and one Principles of Literary Analysis. Gen. Ed.: Literary case Studies. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS).

English 350c: Literature of the Age of Revolution

This is a literary analysis course with a thematic focus on vital questions in political, social, and economic life that arose during the period that has been called the Age of Revolution—questions which are highly relevant today and which were initially raised and most memorably debated during the period that historians now call “the long eighteenth century” (1685-1815), lasting from the events the led to the so-called “Glorious Revolution” in England until the end of the wars prompted by the French Revolution. During this period recognizably modern political doctrines and economic structures took shape as the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the great socio-economic changes that have come to be termed the financial, the agricultural, and the industrial revolutions decisively challenged old beliefs, institutions, social practices, and authorities. The readings for this course all deal directly or obliquely, seriously or ironically (often both seriously and ironically), with the questions raised by these various revolutions and represent a variety of genres and styles and a broad spectrum of political convictions and allegiances. They include works notable for their lasting influence on political or economic thought as well as conventionally “literary” poetry, drama, and satire. Lectures and discussions will attend to both the political or social implications and the literary qualities of these texts. Specifically, we will consider each text’s stated or implied political stance in the light of historical circumstances and pay attention to its style, structure, tone, and imagery, to literary features such as use of figurative language and irony and adherence to (or burlesque of) generic conventions. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

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ENG 360 Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism
This course is one of advanced study of various literary theories and the methodologies associated with literary criticism. The course may be comprised of a survey of multiple schools of literary theory and criticism or may focus on one form of literary theory and criticism, in particular. Topics will vary but may include such schools of literary theory as Deconstructionism, Eco-criticism, Feminist literary theory, Formalism, Marxist literary theory, New Criticism, New Historicism, Postcolonialism, Postmodernism, Post-structuralism, and Psychoanalytical literary theory, Queer theory, Reader-response theory, and semiotics. The course may be repeated for credit on different topics. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen Ed.: Literary Case Studies. Cr. 4 (8 ECTS). Offered in the Spring.

Recent courses taught in ENG 360 include

ENG 360a: Psychoanalysis and Literature

This course explores the complex relationship between literature and psychoanalysis with particular attention to the works of Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. Both Freud and Lacan believed that psychoanalysis was a science that would one day be vindicated through scientific proof, however, both analysts drew extensively on literature to support their science and both were unique literary stylists. This course, therefore, considers psychoanalysis as an art, as a form of writing, as well as utilizing psychoanalytic theory to read and understand literary texts. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Freudian theory along with Freud’s writing on art and culture. We will consider the case study as a literary genre and, alternative, Freudian theory as a model for narrative interpretation. We will look at Lacan’s re-reading of Freud and Jacques Derrida’s “deconstruction” of psychoanalysis. Finally we will explore the issues of abjection and feminine masquerade in psychoanalysis and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis. Gen. Ed.: Literary Case Studies. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS).

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ENG 370 Genre and Topical Studies    
Advanced study of literary or filmic texts that belong to a specific genre or cultural tradition or that share a specific set of thematic concerns. Particular topics will vary, and the course may be repeated for credit on another topic. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed: Literary Case Studies. Cr.4. (8 ECTS Cr.) Offered irregularly. 

Recent courses taught in ENG 370 include

ENG 370a: Counterculture Literature

Counterculture Literature traces the shadow side of the literary arts. The course concentrates on primarily modern works in fiction, poetry and drama that subverted literary and moral norms and explores the writers and movements (both artistic and cultural) that sparked these deviations. Moving in a semi-chronological manner we will examine the historical and cultural events that gave rise to authors and literary/artistic groups outside the mainstream. Building on the literary analysis skills gained from Eng 210 (a prerequisite for this course), our focus will be on the close reading, explication and discussion of primary texts by these authors; we will also read mainstream literary analogues, and secondary sources, both of the period and contemporary, for depth and context. In addition to the readings, the course will survey significant art, music and films that sprang from these various literary subcultures. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

ENG 370b: Modernism

This course will introduce students to one of the most important literary and artistic movements of the twentieth century, modernism. The course will focus on European and North American modernism stressing the international dimension of modernism. We will cover the period from approximately the late nineteenth century and the emergence of modernism through the period of “high modernism” (1910-1925) to modernisms final exhaustion in the mid-twentieth century and the experiments of the French “nouveau roman”. The course will emphasize the cultural diversity of this movement drawing upon a variety of literary texts including the critical essay, the literary manifesto, the short story, poetry, drama, the novel as well as painting and film. Finally, the course will contextualize these texts in terms of the social, historical and political events of the time, paying particular attention to the transformation of subjectivity, time and space.  Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

ENG 370c: Satire

In this course we will analyze and discuss some acknowledged masterpieces of satirical writing and consider some examples of more recent satire in various media as we explore basic questions about what satire is, what satirists do, why they do it, and how we judge how well they have done it. More specifically, we will begin by considering the traditional consensus among literary historians, theorists, critics, and satirists themselves on the following points: that satire includes writings, performances, and images that ridicule human vice, corruption, injustice, stupidity, and delusion; that in proper satire this ridicule must direct some kind of attack or critique (which may range from gentle admonishment to fierce denunciation) at an identifiable target as it evokes some kind of laughter (which may range from grim to uproarious) at the target’s expense; that in satire this ridicule must be artful in some way, with irony, mimicry, exaggeration, and wit (often displayed in wordplay and fictional analogies) the most characteristic means of making this ridicule artful and effective in the best satire. We will move this consensus, however, as we consider varied and sometimes conflicting answers that influential theorists and practitioners of satire have offered to some basic questions about the nature and value of satire, such as, what distinguishes satire from—and what links it to—other kinds of discourse (e.g. polemics, black comedy, utopian or dystopian fiction) that share significant traits with it?  Other basic questions concern the intentions of the satirist and the moral justification of satire. Such questions will be considered directly in class discussions and secondary readings and referred to in our analyses of the assigned texts, where we will focus attention on each text’s particular tonal effects and thematic concerns and try to determine the relation each text implies between satirist and target, satirist and audience, and audience and target. We will also note the particular satiric devices and motifs exemplified in each piece of satire, especially as these recur in several assigned texts. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

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ENG 380 Major Authors  
Intensive study of one or two major British or American writers:  e.g. Chaucer, Milton, Browning, Melville, Yeats, Faulkner, Woolf, Porter, Stevens. The course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed: Literary Case Studies. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered irregularly.

Recent courses taught in ENG 380 include

ENG 380a: T. S. Eliot: An American Individual Voice in the European

Tradition

The Anglo-American poet Thomas Stearns Eliot is one of the most important and influential names in the English language poetry and literature of the 20th century.  In his essay “Tradition and Individual Talent,” published in 1920, Eliot writes: “No poet, no artist of any art, has his complete meaning alone. His significance, his appreciation is the appreciation of his relation to the dead poets and artists.” and later in the same text: “What happens is a constant surrender of himself (the poet) as he is at the moment to something which is more valuable. The progress of an artist is a continual self-sacrifice, a continual extinction of personality.” Eliot's poetry is a constant dialogue with writers and texts from the past, it is full of explicit and hidden quotations and allusions, it entirely inscribes itself in the English and European literary and cultural tradition. Yet Eliot's individual talent, his personal poetic voice, is so strong and specific that we can read and appreciate his poetry even without any knowledge of the voices he quotes, reverberates, or talks with. He is an American individual talent who attempts, and succeeds, to embody in his poetry not only the English but the European cultural tradition in general. That is why we can say that T.S. Eliot is an American talent in the European tradition. In this class, we will read and discuss in depth Eliot's most important poems, from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” to the Four Quartets, as well as his play “Murder in the Cathedral.” We will discuss both the form and “craft,” and the intellectual and cultural content of his poetry. We will talk about Eliot as an individual voice and part of the European tradition, a modernist and a conservative, a poet and an influential literary critic in the time of Modernism, the first half of the 20th century. The course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed: Literary Case Studies. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.)

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ENG 388 Shakespeare
This course focuses on an advanced study of a selection of Shakespeare's major plays representing different dramatic genres and may include study of his sonnets or other non-dramatic poems. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Literary Analysis course. Gen. Ed: Literary Case Studies. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered irregularly.

Theatre

THR 130 Beginning Acting   
Fundamental techniques in building a character using voice, body, mind, and imagination. Students will work on exercises, improvisations, monologues, dialogues, and short scenes. Gen. Ed: Aesthetic Expression. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester.

THR 211 Introduction to Theater    
Basic theatrical elements, techniques, and the processes by which plays are translated into theatrical expression are introduced through study of major dramatic works, playwrights, genres, and form in historical context. Opened to all students. Gen. Ed: Aesthetic Expression. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester. 

THR 222 Applied Theater   
Optional credit for significant participation in AUBG theater productions or performances staged in conjunction with theater classes. Technical students develop procedures, research, and coordinate a particular aspect of production; acting students develop, research and perform a role in production. Gen. Ed: Aesthetic Expression. Cr.1-3. (2-6 ECTS Cr.) Offered in the Fall. 

THR 230 Intermediate Acting    
Continuation of FAR 251. This course will help students develop techniques of using body, voice, mind and imagination in improvisational exercises and extended scene work. Students will examine approaches to acting through film and live performance and analyze contemporary plays from the actor's point of view. Students will be required to keep an acting journal. Prerequisite: FAR 251. Gen. Ed: Aesthetic Expression. Cr.3. (6 ECTS Cr.) Offered in the Spring. 

Creative Writing

ENG 205 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction 
This course offers students experience in writing in the major forms of fiction and non-fiction. (WIC) Cr.4. (8 ECTS Cr.) Gen. Ed: Principles of Literary Analysis. Offered every semester. 

ENG 206 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry  
This course aims to bring students closer to the craft of poetry. The visual, the musical, and the verbal aspects of poetry will be discussed. Students will read and analyze some examples of the best world poetry written in or translated into English. Students will also bring to class their own poems or translations of poems. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 101. Gen Ed: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 4. (8 ECTS Cr.) Offered every semester. 

Film

FLM 220 Film Criticism
This course introduces students to the main elements of film form and criticism, principally style (mise-en-scene, cinematographic properties, editing, sound) and narrative (structure and narration). The course aims to provide students with the necessary terminology to analyze film as filmic texts, and to strengthen students' analytical skills in relation to other forms of text. The course examines how different types of film operate formally through the analysis of both narrative and non-narrative (the documentary and the avant-garde) film; it considers different analytical approaches to Hollywood films of the studio era with focus on how the critical categories of genre and author have proven relevant; and, it examines several alternatives to Hollywood practice, including the contemporary US independent cinema and European cinema. Prerequisites: ENG 102, Gen Ed.: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 3 (6 ECTS Cr.). Offered irregularly.

FLM 221 Screenwriting
This course is intended to give students an in-depth understanding of the principles and mechanics of scriptwriting and to provide them with the skills and experience needed to write well-structured and imagined scripts that are current with industry standards. Students will analyze produced scripts, develop various screenwriting skills through short writing assignments and develop a short, feature film script. Prerequisites: ENG 102, Gen. Ed: Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.). Offered in the Spring.

FLM 320  Psychoanalysis and Cinema
This course will address the relationship between psychoanalysis and cinema from two perspectives: first, considering the way in which cinema has historically attempted to represent the unconscious and its impact on film form. Second, the course will explore the ways in which psychoanalytic concepts such as dreams, transference, imaginary, masquerade, fetishism, fantasy, the gaze and the objet a have been used to account for our investment, as spectators, in cinematic representation.  Drawing on films from both Hollywood and other cinemas (including Secrets of the Soul (1926) Un chien andalou (1929), Now Voyager (1942), Spellbound (1944), Brief Encounter (1945), Psycho (1960), Peeping Tom (1960), Blue Steel (1990), Crash (1996), A Snake of June (2003)) this course will explore the complex history of representing unconscious desire from the early Surrealist experiments, through the pioneering work of Baudry and Metz in the 1970s on film ideology to the feminist critique of the cinematic spectacle and spectatorship.

Recent courses taught in ENG 320

FLM 320a: Psychoanalysis and Cinema

Psychoanalysis and cinema both emerged in the closing years of the nineteenth century and since their inception have maintained an ambivalent relationship. Freud’s early followers saw the new medium of film as an ideal way to disseminate the new “science” of psychoanalysis while Freud himself remained skeptical that the unconscious could ever be represented. This course will address the relationship between psychoanalysis and cinema from two perspectives: first, considering the way in which cinema has historically attempted to represent the unconscious and its impact on film form. Second, the course will explore the ways in which psychoanalytic concepts such as dreams, transference, imaginary, masquerade, fetishism, fantasy, the gaze and the objet a have been used to account for our investment, as spectators, in cinematic representation.  Drawing on films from both Hollywood and other cinemas (including Secrets of the Soul (1926) Un chien andalou (1929), Now Voyager (1942), Spellbound (1944), Brief Encounter (1945), Psycho (1960), Peeping Tom (1960), Blue Steel (1990), Crash (1996), A Snake of June (2003)) this course will explore the complex history of representing unconscious desire from the early Surrealist experiments, through the pioneering work of Baudry and Metz in the 1970s on film ideology to the feminist critique of the cinematic spectacle and spectatorship. The course will conclude with an assessment of contemporary, Žižekian inspired psychoanalytic film studies. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

FLM 320b: From Stage to Screen: Film Adaptation of Dramatic Texts

In this course we will analyze and discuss film adaptations of significant theatre plays. Our focus will be on the works of William Shakespeare, but we will also extend our interest to the works of Oskar Wilde, Bernard Show, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, John Osborn, and Harold Pinter. The course will also have a creative part. Every student will have to write a scene for TV/film adaptation of chosen play. There will be option to work individually or in groups for translating a dramatic text into a scenario. The principal forms of adapting techniques will be analyzed and discussed. The formats and templates for professional scriptwriting will be used. Prerequisites: ENG 102, one Principles of Textual Analysis course. Gen. Ed. Case Studies in Textual Analysis. (WIC) Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.)

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FLM 371 History, Memory and Narrative in Balkan Cinema
This course explores contemporary Balkan cinema in relation to questions of history, memory and regional identify. The course draws on a broad range of recent films to address the Balkans as a social and political imaginary as well as the question of whether or not there is an identifiable "Balkan" cinema. Issues of national cinema, the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, the presentation of the Roma, Balkan stereotypes and gender will be considered, as well as the emergence of the new national and regional film traditions. (WIC) Prerequisites: ENG 102, Gen Ed.: one Principles of Literary Analysis. Cr. 4 (8 ECTS Cr.). Offered irregularly.

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